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Saturday, January 24, 2015

Blue Birds and Christmas Cactus January 23, 2015

Today I am linking with-

Wild Bird Wednesday hosted by Stewart M.

Today's Flowers hosted by Denise

Saturday Critters hosted by Eileen

Macro Monday 2 hosted by Gemma and Mystical Magical Teacher

I Heart Macro hosted by Laura

For my wild blue birds, I again present some Steller's Jays-  "Which is better, my right side-"

"Or my left side?"

"Or perhaps my back side?"

"My breaking wave impersonation."



video

And now for a domestic bird, my Blue Maran hen, who lays chocolate eggs-  "Cold? not me."

"Can you say 'pulchritude'?"

"I know it's here somewhere...."

"Back off!"

"La belle Cocoa"

Cocoa's egg is on the left, apparently the "factory" ran out of paint partly down the chute.  The egg is on the extra large/jumbo size, and the yolks are gloriously golden orange, especially compared to those store bought eggs, even organic, that don't eat fresh grass daily-

She makes me think about how God promises to hide me under the wings of His protection and love, when I abide in His secret place of worship and praise, and say to Him, "I am Yours."



This week in my continuing blooming houseplant series, another tough plant, and easy to propagate from cuttings- my Christmas Cactus bloomed late, it is the red variety.  Better late than never-


Spring draws slowly closer, buds seem to be forming on the Hellebores.  I am waiting for spring....
Hannah                                              or cameras are macro

©Weeding on the Wild Side, all rights reserved.   I enjoy visiting your blog and commenting but can't do so if google+ is the only option, so will comment here instead.

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Scrub Jay and Orchid January 17, 2015

Welcome, today I am linking with-

Wild Bird Wednesday hosted by Stewart M.

Today's Flowers hosted by Denise

Saturday's Critters hosted by Eileen

Macro Monday 2 hosted by Gemma and Mystical Magical Teacher

I Heart Macro hosted by Laura

Mostly Steller's Jays come to eat seeds on my deck,  "Who's the new kid?"

but a couple of times a Scrub Jay has come on over, they are usually in nearby neighborhoods at lower altitude.  "Hi guys, nice spread!"

"Check it out!"

Egad!

"You guys are seriously fluffy!"

"Well, I'm off!"

When I lived in San Diego the Scrub Jays lived there, but if we went camping in the "mountains", in Julian, we would see the birds there that also live here in my woodsy garden- The Steller's Jays, Juncos, Nuthatches and Chickadees.   It's like I live on a camping trip now.

Featured house plant this week is an orchid, this one has splotchy petals and seems to bloom about twice a year like a former orchid.  It is just opening new flowers now,

It also bloomed in June. "Doing my Fearsome Fang impersonation."


In the beauty of the flowers and the birds, I can't help but see the loving hand of Creator God and thank Him.    -Hannah

or cameras are macro

©Weeding on the Wild Side, all rights reserved.  I enjoy visiting your blogs and commenting but can't do so if google+ is the only option, so will comment here instead.

Friday, January 9, 2015

Song Sparrow and Hoya australis, January 9, 2015

Today I am linking with-

Wild Bird Wednesday hosted by Stewart M.

Today's Flowers hosted by Denise

Saturday's Critters hosted by Eileen

Macro Monday 2 hosted by Gemma and Mystical Magical Teacher

Another bird that comes to eat black sunflower seeds is the Song Sparrow, which sings sweetly in the summer and may eat more berries than I would like.  It can be found over most of the USA at some time of the year.   "Do you like my whiskers?"

It has a dark spot on its chest, as though it had been shot.
"Argh, you got me!"

Going, going....



Gone

Next in my houseplant blooming series is Hoya australis, smaller in leaf and flower than my other featured wax plant, Hoya carnosa, and an equally tough plant.  Hoya australis didn't bloom in the summer like carnosa but waited until November.  I like the waxy flowers, and gentle exotic scent. 






 I'm indulging my growing obsession by sowing seeds to get to watch them grow.  Now I am in the transplanting phase of my early perennial seedlings under lights, the back rows so far, lots more to do.

They include Gaillardia, Salvia, Rudbeckia 'Cherry Brandy' (annual) which I hope will be exciting, Creeping Thyme, Monarda, and Sweet William.   I hope by starting them early I can get blooms earlier.  I will be starting some vegetables and annuals soon as well.   I hope you are having a restful winter season- or a happy summer for those of you in the southern hemisphere.  In addition to my shelves where I grow seedlings indoors, I also have an aquaponics system that can handle some plants when they get taller than 11" that will fit on the shelves.

The passing of the seasons and years reminds me that time moves on but God has opened to me the door of eternity and tells me Who I am-

 -Hannah

                                                   or cameras are macro

©Weeding on the Wild Side, all rights reserved.   I enjoy visiting your blog and commenting but can't do so if google+ is the only option, so will comment here.





Thursday, January 1, 2015

Happy New Year! Pine Siskins and Epiphyllum January 1, 2015

Happy New Year!  I saw the new year in with my grandkids, we assembled a hard jigsaw puzzle (all those shades of off white!), watched some fireworks out of the frosty window, and drank a toast at midnight.

Today I am linking with-

Wild Bird Wednesday hosted by Stewart M.

Saturday's Critters hosted by Eileen

Today's Flowers hosted by Denise

Macro Monday 2 hosted by Gemma and Mystical Magical Teacher

My bird visitors have been very busy eating seeds in our frosty weather, a group of Pine Siskins showed up, with the hilarious name of Spinus pinus.   I had never seen them here before, they are very social in their large bubbling group.  "Cheers!"

"Quit shoving!"

"I'm cute!"

Especially when I'm leaving, when I resemble some eyebrows, whether menacing or deep in thought.

I was surprised by some short-lived blooms on my Ric Rac Cactus, Epiphyllum anguliger, first photo from last year when there were more flowers-


Like other Epi's, they are tough houseplants, hard to kill, surviving dry soil well, and easy to propagate with cuttings.   I just wish the flowers would stick around a little longer.  But at least I have a Friend who will never leave me or forsake me.


Make 2015 your best year ever!     Hannah

or cameras are macro

©Weeding on the Wild Side, all rights reserved.  I like to visit your blog and leave commments, but can't do so if google+ is the only option, so will comment here.







Friday, December 19, 2014

Towhees and Amaryllis, Reindeer and Angels, in the dark December 19, 2014


Welcome to my end of the autumn post.  I am writing this in the second black-out in 4 days.  I really appreciate electricity when I don't have any. 



Today I am linking with-

Wild Bird Wednesday hosted by Stewart M.

Today's Flowers hosted by Denise

Saturday's Critters hosted by Eileen

Macro Monday 2 hosted by Gemma  and Mystical Magical Teacher

I heart Macro hosted by Laura

This is the most Christmasy bird that comes to eat my black sunflower seeds, I am used to calling it the Rufous-sided Towhee, but the western race is now called the Spotted Towhee.   They are not as bold as the Chickadees, Steller's Jays, and Nuthatches, but I have a few photos.   You must guess what I think makes them look Christmasy-


"Check it out!"

"101, 102...... and they're all mine!"

"A tough nut to crack"

"Don't even think about it!"

They are large sparrows at 7 1/2" / 19 cm, and I haven't observed them having any obnoxious habits, unlike their relatives the Canyon Towhee I had in southern California, who could go down a row of freshly planted corn, pea, or bean seeds and somehow locate each seed.   They had a sneaky technique of jumping backwards digging with their feet and left neat round holes where each seed had been.   

In order to grow those crops I had to cover the planted rows with wire mesh, then lay greenery on top to obscure the view of the ground so the seeds could sprout.  A handy herb for this was Sanguisorba minor, the cucumber-flavored Salad Burnet, which loved San Diego and would spread all over by seed and make lots of 2' clumps of greenery, and it would take a lot of them to get enough branches to cover all the rows.  But I did succeed in outsmarting the Towhees.  There, I could grow peas in the winter.

My featured houseplant this week is the wonderfully Christmasy Amaryllis.  The care for a potted Amaryllis is to put it in a dark place and let it go dormant for 10-12 weeks, then bring it out and water it, and this triggers the bloom season.
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Some Chanukah lights in a special 9-candle Chanukiah (menorah), and also my little tree Chanukiah that has cups a little small for holding candles,

so I use the bigger one.  Chanukah is the Festival of Lights, a time for self-reflection and re-dedication.

Wow, the lights are back on.   Happy Chanukah and Merry Christmas.  And Happy Birthday to me.    Hannah


                                                 or cameras are macro

©Weeding on the Wild Side, all rights reserved.   I like to visit your blog and comment but can't if google+ is the only option so will comment here.