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Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Wildflower Wednesday June 25, 2014

Welcome to my Wildflower Wednesday post, to see other wildflowers from around the world, join hostess Gail at Clay and Limestone.

I'm also linking with Outdoor Wednesday hosted by Susan at A Summer Daydreamer.

The most spectacular wildflower blooming for me now is Fireweed, Chamerion angustifolium, here with Yarrow and Spirea.




Ocean Spray, Holodiscus discolor, is also blooming, a delicate spray of tiny white flowers-


 I was delighted to find Aquilegia formosa, the native Columbine, had survived after all in my garden, not a very substantial plant compared to the tall double ones, but love the color-

Spring Beauty is still blooming-

The large native Borage family Phacelia hastata, with its scorpioid inflorescences, it keeps some native pollinators happy for a long time, so I let this large one grow in one of my vegetable beds-


So, what is blooming in your yard that is wild or native?  -Hannah

©Weeding on the Wild Side, all rights reserved.







19 comments:

  1. Your colorful wildflowers look so pretty against the green backdrop of your garden. Borage seedheads are fascinating. Scorpiod is a great term for those.

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  2. Thanks, Shirley, all my Western Cedars provide a lot of green backdrop. Scorpiod is a fun descriptive term I encountered when reading about the Borage family, which is rather important in my garden for natives and also for many cultivated plants and even many weeds. They have better blues than most plant families.

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  3. Your wildflowers are beautiful! I was in Oregon recently and I think it was the Discussions that I found so beautiful. Are you familiar with the Oregon Flora Project? They've recently developed and published an app for phones to ID native plants.

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    1. My comment ended up below the one for Diane Studer... sorry.

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  4. your fireweed looks good enough to eat!

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    1. Thanks, Diana, I looked it up and one site said the very young leaves can be eaten, the flower buds, and the leaves at time of flowering can be dried and made into tea. I will have to try some!

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  5. That app looks interesting, my usual resource is-

    http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection.php?Genus=Circaea&Species=alpina

    I get really good results to just searching google with some specific plant characteristics.

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  6. beautiful wildflower images.

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    1. Thanks, Felicia, I enjoy the native plants that grow here, though they are often not as flashy or colorful as the east coast natives.

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  7. A delicious compositions, wonderful flowers!

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    1. Thanks, Leovi, the fireweed gets bigger every year.

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  8. Hi Hannah! I'm glad to hear about Wildflower Wednesday! I hope to join in sometime in the future as there are many wildflowers in my area of Colorado. I love the color of the Columbine flower in your garden and the Ocean Spray plant is really beautiful!

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    1. Thanks, Pat, I lived in Denver for 6 years, I especially loved the alpine wildflowers, such exquisite little tiny flowers.









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  9. Those are some amazing flowers. I love all the great colors you found.

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    1. Thanks, Betty, I don't know much about New Zealand native flowers.

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  10. Hi Hannah-- Wonderful to see your Northwest native plants, especially the Ocean Spray, one of my favorites -- I've never seen it on anyone else's blog before. When the flowers are just budded they are wonderful in bouquets, something I learned from a gardener-florist. And you have given the borage a whole vegetable bed to make the native insects happy-- it reminds me of me and the rufous hummingbird...

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  11. Thanks, Linnie, nice to meet another PNW blogger and gardener. My ocean spray leans a lot, I have to prop it up. I'll have to see if I could cut it since it has a weeping habit. The native plant which is in the Borage family restrains itself at the end of a bed, but the herb Borage self-sows in that vegetable bed and tries to take over the whole area.

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  12. So many lovely flowers especially the fireweed.

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  13. This reminds me I need to walk over to see my own Holodiscus discolor. There's a large one along the fence line that I can't see anymore since the Port Orfords have grown to block it from view unless you walk through them.

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