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Monday, March 24, 2014

Tomatoes!

Welcome to my post, I am linking with-

Mandarin Orange Monday hosted by Lorik

I Heart Macro hosted by Laura

Macro Monday 2 hosted by Gemma Wiseman

Monday Mellow Yellows hosted by Gemma Wiseman

My house actually gained 2 dgrees heat beyond the setting on my thermostat the last 2 days, spring is here.   I enjoyed working in the garden in the sunshine.   Here is an extremely fragrant Daffodil, Martinette.

I'm late starting my tomatoes this year, but my little seedlings are doing great.   I am again starting seeds in small ziplock bags from a bead store, 2x3".   I cut a piece of paper towel to fit inside and this year I wanted fewer seedlings so I did 7 seeds just in case some didn't sprout, but in spite of using some old seeds from 2004 I had good germination, so I didn't really end up with fewer seedlings, present count is at 52.   Some will be for my son and daughter-in-law's garden.   I was busy so left them a little long so many had roots at 1" long, 2.5 cm, some were just barely sprouting.   I also can only do 10 or so per day since I microwave the potting soil/ perlite/ peat moss starting mix and do a few each evening, so the last seedlings are considerably behind the first, though started at the same time, though I start with the most developed sprouts so the slowest would naturally come last.   I start tomato seeds in ziplocks because I used to plant 4 seeds to a 2" pot and then have to split up the 1-4 sprouts and re-pot them later, and now I just pot one seedling per pot and save that step, and only use pots for viable seedlings.  The little seedlings have to be handled very carefully and when they are 1" long they are frequently twisted and hard to orient, but I just try to place the seed leaves just above or below the surface depending on if they are free of the seed coat, and the very wimpy pale seedlings in just a few days look like this, started March 1 and taken on March 24-


My tomato list for this year is:
New- Sweetie cherry tomato
New- Rio Grande paste tomato
Bicolor- Lucky Cross
Black Pear
Black Sea Man
Shapka Monomakh
San Marzano
Legend
Unk small round tomato
Verna's Orange Oxheart

To see my ziplock starting method and my tomatoes last year when ready to plant out, click here.

The star first bloomer of my perennials I started under lights November 15, 2013, the impressive Browallia speciosa, with bigger blooms than the B. americana I grew last year but shorter height.


I hope winter has loosened its grip on your garden now too.   Hannah

or cameras are macro

©Weeding on the Wild Side, all rights reserved, no unauthorized copying without permission.

33 comments:

  1. Nice photos, congrats on getting your tomatoes started.

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  2. Gorgeous, really lovely flowers. I love tomatoes! Have a nice day!

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  3. Thanks, Leovi. I always marvel when something beautiful grows for me.

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  4. Your tomatoes look great! I started mine not too long ago, and they are a little behind yours. Just starting to get true leaves.

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  5. Thanks, Alison. It's exciting to see them growing so fast, the sprouts looked terrible when I planted them.

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  6. How beautiful ! seems that spring finally moved in ! I love this season !

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    1. Thanks, Gattina, I've had some lovely warm days to work outside, and more flowers all the time.

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  7. I love the daffodils. The tomatoe plants are looking good. It's amazing how fast they grow.

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    1. Thanks, Gunilla, the daffodils really shine in the early spring garden. It feels great to have the tomato seedlings growing.

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  8. I just love your daffodils... I wish I had some in a vase on my table...or garden. A lovely symbol of spring....autumn here:) Thanks for sharing on Mandarin Orange Monday:)

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    1. I had some on the table for my son's birthday party. They last a long time.

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  9. You truly have a green thumb. Your daffodils and star bloomers are gorgeous, and can tell your sprouts are off to a good start. Blessings!

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    1. Thanks, Arnoldo. I love starting seedlings under lights where I can control everything.

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  10. Wonderful photos of your ambitious gardening. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks, Janice, good growing to you.

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  11. That is an impressive list of tomatoes. I see that we have one in common - San Marzano. I haven't grown it before so I'm interested to see how it will do.

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    1. Thanks, Dorothy, paste and heart tomatoes are my favorites, since they are meatier with fewer seeds.

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  12. I like you list of tomatoes. I have a few a day and they are great. I am sure your fresh ones will taste amazing. There is nothing like a fresh pecked tomato.

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    1. I'm trying Lucky Cross again this year, some years it has not come true to seed, so here's hoping. It is an amazing bumpy very large bicolor with wonderful tropically fruity flavor.

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  13. When daffs suddenly appear -- it always brings a smile to me -- sudden influx of hope ... sooner or later, winter will be over.

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    1. I hope winter is over for you, I enjoy you art work and rays of hope and comfort on your blog.

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  14. Lovely to see plants bursting forth again.....there's a great sense of renewal in the air.

    Happy weekend!
    Ruby

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  15. Thanks, Ruby, I enjoyed all your photos of flowing waters.

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  16. I love your seeding method for the tomatoes. Our garden club is doing a series on planting tips. I hope you don't mind but I will be telling them about this-and telling them where they can come for more information.

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    1. Thanks Susan, that would be great if you share my blog address. I glad you liked it.

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  17. thank you so much for the tip on zip loc bags for sowing seeds - I will have to try that method this year :)

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    1. That's great, it does take some careful handling of the little seedlings, especially when they get long and the roots can grow into the paper towel. I generally grab the edges of the towel on each side of the root and pull them gently apart so hopefully the root is then free. I am always amazed how the sickly looking yellowish seedlings green up so fast after planting.

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  18. Spring is just now showing itself a little. It is too early for tomato starting but by the end of this week I hope to get started.

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    1. It is early, the reason I can start early is that I use tunnels, TunLCover, to plant tomatoes and other vegetables under, they give frost protection and also raise the temperature of the soil 10 degrees F. Otherwise I would have to wait until later.

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  19. lovely orange in the daffodil. :)

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    1. Thanks, I really enjoy daffodils with orange cups, and also the really fragrant ones.

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  20. I love that browalia! Tomatoes are fun to start because they grow so eagerly. I'm growing Mortgage Lifters this year from seed.

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    1. Yes, tomatoes are so easy, peppers and especially eggplants give me fits. I would love it if I could find some that grow like tomatoes. The Browallia looks great so far, I'm interested in how it does planted out in the garden.

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