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Saturday, August 15, 2015

GBBD, Fruitful August 15, 2015

Today I am linking with

Skywatch Friday hosted by Yogi, Sandy, and Sylvia

Orange You Glad It's Friday hosted by Maria

Today's Flowers hosted by Denise

Saturday's Critters hosted by Eileen

Garden Blogger's Bloom Day hosted by Carol

Macro Monday 2 hosted by Gemma and Mystical Magical Teacher

I Heart Macro hosted by Laura

In a Vase on Monday hosted by Cathy

Someone to watch over me-

It's Garden Blogger's Bloom Day again, join hostess Carol at May Dreams Gardens, link above,  to see what is blooming in other gardens.   Rozanne hardy geranium is going strong-


Coreopsis lanceolata-


Gaillardia 'Tokajer'-

The Rose of Sharons are blooming, here.  Some roses are still blooming sporadically, Monsieur Tillier, here for In a Vase on Monday, with Coreopsis, Chaste tree bloom, a sprig of Euphorbia cyparassias (cut with caution, harmful milky sap), Fireweed, and Ageratum.  The container is a globe that was cherished by my mother-in-law's family, stabilized by a pot I made.




What's fruiting now is also interesting to me, probably Zelma Zesta (or maybe Rattlesnake) and Uncle Steve's pole beans-

Grandma Robert's purple pole beans-

Insuk's Wang Kong Runner Beans-

Green Seedless grapes-

Glenora seedless grape-

Another pigeon from the fair, this one can strut like a peacock-


What's blooming and fruiting for you?   Hannah

©Weeding on the Wild Side, all rights reserved.   I enjoy reading your comments, and will visit your blog and leave comments there if possible, but I am not able to do so if google + is the only option.

I had a comment about problems with leaving a comment here.  If you are having trouble commenting on my blog, you can send me an email at  z8hannah8z@gmail.com to comment and let me know of your difficulties.  Thanks!  I looked up solutions on Blogger and apparently Wordpress has not updated their Open ID servers, so to comment on Blogspot blogs, you must select OpenID then enter your address, changing it to plain http://address  instead of https://address.







62 comments:

  1. Nothing fruiting, blooming are the daffs, snowdrops, the protea, Rhododendrons, Camellias, and a day lily or two. Must post some photos to show we do have flowers out here in winter.

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  2. Ahhh, enjoy those early flowers, Jean. I'm surprised you would have daylilies so soon. I picked my first tomatoes today too.

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  3. Hello Hannah, your sky shot is beautiful. And I love all your pretty blooms. The Gaillardia is one of my favorites. Your struting pigeon is cool looking, great capture! Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. Have a happy weekend!

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    1. Thanks, Eileen, I don't remember seeing black streaks like that before. I love the Gaillardia but hoped for it to be more of a mound. Thanks for hosting.

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  4. Hi! The roses in a vase photos are very beautiful. Thanks for sharing.

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  5. Hi! The roses in a vase photos are very beautiful. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks, Minoru, I really enjoyed your Japanese mountain wildflowers this week, so fantastic.

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    1. Thanks, Tina, they are very sweet. As usual there's nothing like homegrown, but the purple ones don't know when to quit.

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  7. Dearest Hannah; Oh, I admire your wonderful orange sky photo. I REALLY LOVED your flower arrangement in globe-shaped vase♪ I could feel Western atmosphere within the beauty♡♡♡ It sure is amazing for me to realize your expertise and can sense your love for nature, Dear friend. The pigeon is strutting and thanks for reminding of the cute word :-)
    Sending Lots of Love and Hugs from Japan to my Dear friend in America, xoxo Miyako*

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    1. Thanks, Miyako san, I saw the sunset glow and ran to the back fence to take it before it faded. I like the globe, it is possibly quite old. I've loved nature since I was a small child. Hugs from the PNW, dear friend!

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  8. cute and proud pigeon! lovely sky.

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    1. Thanks, Theresa, they are fun to watch, I try to imaging raising pigeons.

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  9. Stunning color in your photos, Hannah.

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    1. Thanks, Linda, I'm enjoying the summer, and now it has cooled down so much more comfortable.

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  10. Gorgeous skies and I love all the flowers. Have a wonderful weekend, Hannah!

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    1. Thanks, Gunilla, I'm glad to still have flowers blooming, it even rained a little yesterday. I enjoyed your horses and wonderful deep green grass.

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  11. The hardy geranium is beautiful and I do love the bouquet and the vase. Those beans and the grapes are going to provide some good eating!

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    1. Rozanne is an amazing geranium, she really puts her heart into putting out as many flowers as possible. The "Rattlesnake" beans are really wonderful, completely tender and stringless, succulent and flavorful. But I'm not really sure of the name, they could even be Zelma Zesta, I didn't do a good job with labels when I planted. But I will save the seeds. I really enjoy growing heirloom beans since I've never seen them for sale in the store, whereas heirloom tomatoes do make it to the store. And the heirlooms are so wonderful.

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  12. Lovely skt shot and flowers as wells the Pigeon.

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    1. Thanks, Margaret, I'm impressed with the Gaillardias, it's the first time I've suceeded in growing them, and it turns out the Coreopsis even have a little fragrance, though they are horribly floppy. But very floriferous.

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  13. That beautiful blue geranium is a knock out. Nice to be able to count on a hardy geranium. Lovely, garden.

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    1. Thanks, Patsy, the camera did put a little too much blue into it. But it's pretty anyway. It has been great so far but is not one that reseeds.

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  14. Breathtaking sky!

    Love your garden too.

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  15. Great sky shot and lovely roses. I want to pick some of the grapes off the vine.

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    1. I picked some green ones last night, the purple ones aren't quite ripe enough. I got some apples and figs too.

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  16. Thanks, Penny, the trees hide most of the sunsets but this one was really glowing.

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  17. Great sky shot and lovely roses. I want to pick some of the grapes off the vine.

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  18. All looks fabulous, I hope my Rozanne grows up to look just like yours!

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    1. Thanks, Bec, it is an amazing geranium, I've seen it doing very well in inhospitable places even.

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  19. Incredible sunset! I like your fancy pigeon, too!

    ;-)

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    1. Thanks, Thunder, it looked like the sky was on fire through the trees. I like looking at the fancy pigeons but don't know what it is like to keep and breed them.

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  20. Hello, my first visit to your lovely blog, nice to see your beautiful vase and great harvest. I wish my Rozanna looked like yours but she died last year after just a few months flowering – too hot and dry for a first year I think. I will try again :-)

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    1. Welcome, Helene, I enjoyed seeing your gorgeous flowers and hearing about your move and garden adventures. The drought here has been hard on a lot of the flowers, and it's always win a few, lose a few.

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  21. Those two varieties of long beans look most unusual. As a veggie fan (but not vegetarian) I would love to try them to see how the flavours compare. I love grapes too- have then for breakfast most days and as a drink most evenings!

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    1. I don't know if Zelma Zesta is available over there.... Grandma Robert's Purple Pole is probably not as available. Are Brits interested in heirloom beans? The Zelma Zesta are wonderful, meaty and fiber free. GRPP is early and only has strings.

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  22. ❤ه° ·.
    Fotos lindas! Belas flores!

    Bom domingo!
    °ه✿♫ Boa semana!
    °ه✿ Beijinhos.
    ºه✿✿ ♫° ·.

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    1. Abraços Magia, agradecimento do PNW!

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  23. Hi Hannah
    Lovely to see what is flowering and ready to eat with you. We are hoping to see Spring v soon after the coldest winter (for us!) in decades, lots of lemons on the lemon tree here!
    Have a lovely week
    Wren x

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    1. Welcome home, Wren, I wish I still had a lemon tree. That's too bad about the cold winter, I wonder if you are having an earlier spring than usual too... I'd like to visit the hot springs with you.

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  24. Lovely variety of flowers. Especially love the colour of the flower in the third photo.

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    1. Thanks, Gemma, that is closer to the actual color of Rozannne, the camera made it bluer in the second photo. Purples seem hard for cameras to capture.

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  25. Oh I wish our grapes would fruit like this....and so much blooming and growing! But oh that vase is gorgeous and the flowers you used are perfect in the vase especially the rose.

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    1. You should see my grapevines, they are a jungle. We can only pick grapes on the outside edges. The PNW causes some plants to do amazing things, I planted an orchard of semi-dwarf apples expecting 6' trees like in San Diego only to end up with 30' trees like standards. Ouch. It is an unusual vase, for sure, Donna.

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  26. Are those beans all named after people you know? How lovely - and so is the actual vase your blooms are in. It looks as if it is a floral orb, floating in the clouds. The perfect rose is set off beautifully by the other blooms - thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thanks, Cathy, no, those are heirloom beans I either bought from companies that sell heirlooms (rodgersheirlooms.com) or I traded for on the Gardenweb bean forum. They are named after someone else's relatives. They have been handed down for generations in parts of the country like Tennessee, mostly in the deep South. My Swedish MIL was very attached to the orb.

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  27. I'm VERY impressed by your grapes, Hannah - mine, as usual, were taken by the birds and the raccoons. The globe makes a lovely vase and that rose is spectacular.

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    1. Thanks, Kris, for a while I had great grapevines in San Diego, then the raccoons attacked, followed by Grape Skeletonizer caterpillars that defoliated them to the point they all died. I haven't had as many pests here. There are raccoons around though. The wasps and hornets can actually be a problem in picking them when ripe, though. Mons. Tillier is one of my tougher OGR's, it does well on my front bank that killed most of the roses I tried.

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  28. What an abundance! I'm sitting here on my lunch break enjoying cherry tomatoes our neighbor gave us. Quite the harvest year, it seems! Your vase is beautiful too!

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    1. Thanks, Anna, tomatoes are just beginning to color for me so I'll be picking lots of those soon.

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  29. Replies
    1. Thanks, Bob, I love this time of year. I enjoyed your bird photos.

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  30. Oh my, those grapes look so delicious!

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    1. Thanks, Amy, they are very sweet. But the purple ones will be hard to keep up with.

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  31. Hello and thank you for leaving a comment on my blog, which is how I found your delightful gardening blog. I look forward to following along on your adventures in the garden.

    Your garden is very productive in the heat of summer. Those grapes look delicious, to say nothing of those beautiful beans. I adore their colors and I bet they taste divine.

    I too enjoy putting little arrangements of whatever is blooming in the garden around my home. Your sweet posy would look right at home by my bedside to cheer me up.

    Again, thank you for commenting on my blog and nice to meet you.

    CD

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  32. Welcome, Chronica, I'm enjoying meeting new people from the In a Vase on Monday bloghop, I enjoyed your informative post on growing and displaying sweet peas. I find them rather demanding to grow but used to enjoy growing a deep blue selection with a gorgeous fragrance.

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  33. such a pretty and simple arrangement in that fabulous globe! (We are also frantically harvesting beans!)

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  34. The beans are so welcome, I wait all year for them to get ripe, so tasty. The globe is a wonder.

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  35. How abundant and beautiful your garden is Hannah! Thanks so much for sharing the love up-close with I Heart Macro ♥

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    1. Thanks, Laura, I planted more beans this year than every before, they are at the top of my list to grow. I have a lot of squash too and tomatoes are just getting started. Photos to come.

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  36. Ah grapes - everywhere around I drive by vineyards, but I can't see the grapes, because they make sure not everyone passing by can just pick them (they would too here in Calif.). Am not familiar with the pole beans - am curious how they taste, so I will keep an eye open for them.

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    1. My grapes are amazing, I didn't know this about grapes but the vines can tip-root and spread, and they came out closer and closer to my vegetable garden, now I have a new big garden in another area and they have grown across my earlier garden and bunches are hanging down everywhere. Pole beans are just another form of plant, they take longer to get going than bush but then bear longer and are more productive. The beans are similar, what is different is heirlooms have a lot different forms and qualities not found in grocery store beans. That's what makes them so worthwhile for me, real taste sensations!

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