Search This Blog

Saturday, September 12, 2015

New Plants, Fall Roses September 12, 2015

Today I am linking with-

Skywatch Friday hosted by Yogi, Sandy, and Sylvia

Floral Friday Fotos hosted by Nick V.

Orange You Glad It's Friday hosted by Maria

Saturday's Critters hosted by Eileen

Today's Flowers hosted by Denise

Macro Monday 2 hosted by Gemma and Mystical Magical Teacher

In a Vase in Monday hosted by Cathy

Garden Blogger's Bloom Day hosted by Carol, see what's blooming around the world!

Tonight's flaming sunset-


I visited Tsugawa Nursery yesterday while my husband paddled his Hobie Bic pedal-powered sailboard at Horseshoe Lake.  Tsugawa's was having a 1/2 price sale on perennials, so I picked up a few- Eryngium zabelii 'Big Blue', which will have steely blue spiky flowers next spring, if it makes it through the winter-

Geranium 'Orkney Cherry', a vigorous plant with little bronzy leaves, covered with little pink flowers-


Limonium latifolium 'Blue Diamond' (Statice), which will be covered with a mist of tiny flowers-

Sanguisorba offincinale 'Chocolate Tip', which has delightful little balls of flowers, and has very dense short foliage with chocolate edges, outdoing all my other Burnets-

My grandkids met us to pedal the boat-

Some Mallards happened by-

And went for a swim-

Nom nom-

And for In a Vase on Monday, and What's Blooming Now, this week I have my small wonderfully fragrant late-blooming Clotilde Soupert, a variegated red and white striped mini rose, and a small white rose with blush edges, here with  fall-blooming heather Daboecia cantabrica 'Atropurpurea'-



Here on velvet-

From the white mini side-




Other flowers are blooming in my garden.   In spite of the drought and increased heat, certain garden troupers continue to bloom, such as the wonderful hardy geranium, Rozanne.   

The Japanese Anemones are doing their late-summer to fall blooming-

Antique Polyantha rose Marie Pavie, another late bloomer-

My Goldenrods are starting to bloom, Solidago shortii 'Solar Cascade', which is slowly spreading by rhizomes-

Also still blooming are a few more roses, like the fabulous Betty Boop-


In my container garden, a favorite combination is tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, and Browallia americana-

Also blooming are some Coreopsis, Ageratum,


 Gaillardia, Dianthus, Ursinia, fall Sedums, Euphorbia 'Ascot Rainbow', and Scabiosa.  

Promise of some other fruits yet to come, hardy Arguta Kiwis Annasanaja, they soften up very late in October.  Inside they look and taste like the fuzzy kiwis but you don't have to peel them-

What is blooming and fruiting in your garden?       Hannah

©Weeding on the Wild Side, all rights reserved.   I enjoy reading your comments, and will visit your blog and leave comments there if possible, but I am not able to do so if google + is the only option.

I had a comment about problems with leaving a comment here.  If you are having trouble commenting on my blog, you can send me an email at  z8hannah8z@gmail.com to comment and let me know of your difficulties.  Thanks!  I looked up solutions on Blogger and apparently Wordpress has not updated their Open ID servers, so to comment on Blogspot blogs, you must select OpenID then enter your address, changing it to plain http://address  instead of https://address.




55 comments:

  1. Love all your posies and other flower shots as well as the Mallards and fruit. Have a great weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks, Margaret, I wish I could be seeing the Puffins too. But the Mallards were fun to see. Too bad I didn't have some bird food to give them, they would have come right up.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hello Hannah, your flowers are lovely. And cute shot of your grandchildren on the paddleboat. The Mallards are fun to see, great captures. Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. Have a happy weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The grandkids enjoy playing on the boat. Today my husband took the boat off to chaperone swimmers in the river. Thanks for hosting, Eileen!

      Delete
  4. A wonderful series of photos!
    I especially like the vase of flowers!
    Have a great week-end!
    Lea

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, I love taking photos of Clotilde Soupert, so photogenic, but even more sniffing the flowers. I was happy to have the red striped rose also blooming.

      Delete
  5. Your pictures are wonderful, from the sunset to the flowers to the water to the flower arrangements.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Linda, I'm enjoying finding flowers for In a Vase on Monday.

      Delete
  6. sweet ducks and pretty blooms. i had some issues with wordpress earlier this week, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Theresa, I so enjoyed your bluebirds taking a bath.

      Delete
  7. What a wonderful goody bag you found, and the kiwi fruit with no-peel?? I haven't seen them here so they must be a hybrid from somewhere else. My pick, your crystal vase of your own flowers, beautiful from every angle.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Jean, hardy kiwis originate in northern China, Siberia, and possibly Japan, so they are relatives of your fuzzy kiwis. It's too cold where I live for the fuzzy ones, but the hardy kiwis do well here, even too well, as it grows way up into an adjoining tree. I'm glad you liked the vase, the flowers seemed to really complement each other to me.

    ReplyDelete
  9. The sunset is gorgeous and I love all the flowers. I had never heard of hardy kiwis before. Have a wonderful weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Gunilla, I never see them in the store here, just in the nursery catalogs. They require a male plant and a female plant, and they get very big and keep trying to grow over everything.

      Delete
  10. The first one was unequalled, brilliant sunset Hannah.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Bob, if I see a good glow at sunset I run for the back fence to see what I can get.

      Delete
  11. Hello Hannah, great find at the nursery, I would love to have ‘Chocolate Tip’ – but it was your kiwis at the end of your post that really caught my eye, I have been thinking of growing kiwis for several years, but haven’t taken the plunge yet. The plants you can buy over here take a good few years before they fruit, and then another good few years before you get a good harvest so not exactly something you can rely on eating the following year. But I would love to have a go! Do yours taste the same as the furry ones you can buy in the supermarket? The variety I have seen here is called ‘Issai’, what’s your called?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I should have looked up the spelling, I guessed wrong, it is Annanasnaja. I also have Ken's Red but it is younger and has not been good at bearing. I have a male Arguta that is very large and vigorous. They take up a lot of room, and Anna. has latched onto the neighboring tree and grown to the top. I have digestive issues with eating fruit, so can't really eat much of the kiwis and also it takes them so long to ripen that it is close to frost and hard to harvest where it goes up in the tree. The Issai is self-fertile and smaller, I guess if you like kiwis and think you can use a lot of fruit you might like it, but I don't have Issai and can't remember how many years it took to have fruit. It does have the same flavor as the fuzzy kiwi but has a smooth edible skin.

      Chocolate Tip has really dense short mounded foliage which is really attractive. I looked at my regular officinale today, it tends to elongate and was 6' tall with the flowers, and floppy.

      Delete
    2. I also have a digestive issue with eating fruit – plus a lot of other things :-)
      I have IBS and follow the Low FODMAP diet, the apples and plums from the trees I inherited in my new garden I will mostly have to give away, although I did have a taste of some of the plums as they were so yummy (shouldn’t really eat plums!). But I can eat kiwis, just not as many as I want every day. As I understand, kiwis store well and can be stored in the fridge for up to 3 months. Over here we have the option between 2 self-fertile varieties, ‘Jenny’ or ‘Issai’, both are said to take 3-4 years to fruit although ‘Issai’ might fruit earlier under very good conditions. ‘Jenny’ is the normal, hairy one, ‘Issai’ the tiny, hairless one. I will only have room for ONE so I am dithering between them.
      Which zone are you in? I am zone 9 according to the American hardiness zone system, we often have just a few days of frost in the winter, just a few hours during the night and then it thaws again and hardly ever snow. The summers are anything from very hot to rather cool, but mostly dry here in the east where I live – I have to water a LOT to keep my plants alive between March and October. I have tried to read about how to grow kiwis and it seems they do well here in Britain although still a rather unusual fruit, and apart from requiring a lot of space and needing pruning they seem to be quite trouble free, is that your experience too where you live?

      Delete
    3. Helene, I also have IBS, I finally kept a log of what I ate to discover which foods I could eat, the only fruits I know I can eat are bananas and dates. I can eat most vegetables, meats, and goat milk, so that is mostly what I eat, and temporarily I'm not eating legumes while taking CMO for my joints. I dropped most of the grains and starches and feel like I'm much healthier. So I can't really be that enthusiastic about kiwis, and I don't think the small ones I grow will store as well as the large fuzzy ones. It is nice not to have to peel them. My favorite fruit I grow is Aronia because it is very high in antioxidants and is a shrub so doesn't require any trellising. The kiwis I grow are extremely vigorous and hard to manage. I haven't had disease or pest problems. I tried the fuzzy ones in San Diego but they needed more water than I was giving them in my hot dry garden and they died. Here it is supposedly zone 8 but I live at a higher altitude and can get cold snaps that will wipe out plants hardy just a few miles away.

      Delete
    4. Hi Hannah, I guessed you probably had IBS, I am not sure how well known the Low FODMAP diet is in US, but in Europe and Australia it has become a very useful tool to deal with this condition, regardless of origin of it (mine is secondary to Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome). The diet is difficult to follow in the beginning, especially if you are cooking for a family, but as I am alone I have found it easier – and I have been on the diet more or less since 2008 – the best thing I have ever done! And every time I cheat and have a piece of bread (I love bread!) I get reminded WHY it is I am putting myself through the ordeal of this diet :-)
      I am missing all the things I can’t eat – apples, lentils and beans mostly – and bread, but there are LOTS of fruit and vegetables I can still eat. Here is a link for you if the Low FODMAP diet is new to you.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FODMAP

      Delete
    5. Helene- I looked at the FODMAP and I don't have a problem with some of the foods, but I have nut and seed allergies that started my problems, so I have to avoid them, and I have been gluten-free for a long time. As long as I stick to my diet I do fine, but don't fit in with the Standard American Diet as it is called so hard to eat in groups or pot lucks. I think most people don't realize what they eat is causing their health problems.

      Delete
  12. Lovely shots of the flowers and a great sky!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Fiona, so much of the time I miss the good color in the sunset. I'm thankful we had some rain so the roses are wanting to rebloom.

      Delete
  13. Replies
    1. Thanks, Rainfield, it's good to hear from you.

      Delete
  14. What a knockout sunset! We are so surrounded by tall trees that we don't get the full effect like that.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thanks, Ricki, I can't see to the east so I can't see the sunrise, and my yard is also full of trees, but to the west is the big cow pasture and a ravine, then hills with trees in the photo, so if I run to the back fence I can capture the sunset.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Always enjoy the variety of photos you share Hannah, not only flowers but interesting critters also. Thank you very much for sharing them with Today's Flowers. I wish you a very happy week :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Denise, there are so many fun blog-hops, I like to visit them and participate too, but I don't get out to photograph birds like some people. In the winter they come to my deck though.

      Delete
  17. Your flowers look great, Hannah. Love the paddleboat fun, too!
    ~

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Thunder, the kids really enjoy it. I enjoy the flowers that keep on blooming.

      Delete
  18. Dear Hanne,
    I'm so in love with the Japanese Anemones, Rozanne, Marie Pavie and all the other wonderful flowers in this post!!!
    I hope you enjoy a good time!
    Have a very happy week!!!
    Katrin :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Katrin, it is like visits from old friends when they start to bloom again, I'm still waiting on the Dahlias, they seem really slow this year. I love to look at the Anemones in the fall.

      Delete
  19. Wonderful flowers still going in your garden and oh that sunset is magnificent Hannah. I love the roses in your vase...what a lovely sight!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The flowers have perked up some from the rain, especially the roses, Donna. I'm enjoying the Anemones, too, though I think they were badly affected by the drought. They also don't seem to do well as a cut flower, they droop pretty fast.

      Delete
  20. Your roses are magnificent, Hannah. I envy you the Japanese Anemones - I've seen no sign of mine and I suspect I've cut the water levels too low for them so, unless El Nino makes an early arrival, I don't expect they'll bloom here at all this year. The paddle boat looks like a lot of fun.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Sadly, my double Anemones from last year and many years before didn't seem to bloom at all this year. In addition to the drought and watering 2 acres I have had knee problems that interfered with dragging hoses to hard-to-reach places, and the Anemones seemed to suffer. The ones pictured were suffering but I did get them watered well and they have perked up. So I am planting more drought-tolerant selections, part is some Manzanitas that need NO summer water after established, and I'm hoping for great things from them. Also more Euphorbias, Alliums, and Sedums are getting planted to show off their low water pizzazz. The boat is fun, it goes really fast thanks to the Hobie Bic drive.

    ReplyDelete
  22. You really made the most of that shopping opportunity - excellent work! The foliage on Sanguisorba officinale 'Chocolate Tip' is beautiful. What a fine addition to the garden. I am now going to research the kiwi - I think it is highly likely to shoot to the top of my wishlist. GBBD can be so expensive!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have to tell you I copied a planting I saw at a nursery, just having a heavy t-post for a support, and that turned out to be highly inadequate, the Anna. grows high into a neighboring tree, and the male sprawls for 20' along the fence behind my garden area and I have to keep cutting off the vines as they come through the fence. Be afraid, be very afraid.

      Delete
  23. I enjoyed reading both your post and all the comments following Hannah. It's amazing what we can learn from gardeners around the world isn't it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I looked at your blog and thought I was able to comment on one entry, then when I tried additional comments it came up google+ only so I couldn't. I don't know what other options for comments are available to google + users, but some people have other options, or an email address would even work.

      Delete
  24. I hit Tsugawa's 50% off sale on Saturday. I love your selections. I'm going to have to try the fuzz free hardy kiwi. We have a 60 foot wide wall covered with the fuzzy ones at the school garden. And lovely bouquet!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Laura, I'm glad to be getting some rain to make it better to plant. I feel like I'm crazy risking planting more stuff when a lot of my spring purchases did not do well in the drought, as in disappeared, but maybe fall planting and a nice wet fall and winter will help them get established. Be warned that the hardy kiwis, like so many fruits, turn into monsters up here.

      Delete
  25. I enjoyed seeing your blooms as well as your vase, Hannah - the shots of the vase from above really show the contents off well. The little pink rose looks sumptuous and with a lovely fragrance it must be really worth its weight in the garden

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Cathy, Clotilde Soupert in some years balls terribly, but this dry year she is in full glory, and irresistible, such a great rose for cutting.

      Delete
  26. You have a beautiful garden!

    Thanks for sharing this post and giving me the idea to also participate!

    I just started a new blog last week about gardening and crafting. You are always welcome visit if you want.

    Greetings, Sofie
    http://sofies-succulent-beads.blogspot.be/2015/09/garden-bloggers-bloom-day-september-2015.html

    ReplyDelete
  27. Gorgeous sunset and I love all the roses!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Tina, I enjoy having the roses start blooming again since we got some rain. We are supposed to get some more this week.

      Delete
  28. Oooh, sanguisorba is one of my favourite groups of plants and Chocolate Tip is a beauty!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Jessica, it has been hard to get them here, and also Persicaria, I guess maybe they have a reputation for being invasive. I was happy to find Chocolate Tip on sale, the foliage is so dense and in such a nice mound. Now I have to figure out where to put it.

      Delete
  29. Lovely shots, Hannah. The roses are just wonderful.
    Your first shot with the sunset and silhouetted trees is perfect for the Saturday Silhouettes meme - http://nixpixmix.blogspot.com.au/search/label/Saturday_Silhouette
    Thanks for participating in the Floral Friday Fotos meme.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Thanks, Nick, it's great that you like to host memes.

    ReplyDelete
  31. A gorgeous sunset! I enjoyed seeing all your blooms and your grandkids having such a good time. Gardening and grandkids--the best things in life!

    ReplyDelete