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Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Wildflower Wednesday Vignette September 23, 2015

Welcome to my Wildflower Wednesday post, celebrating wildflowers with hostess Gail of Clay and Limestone.  I'm also linking to Wednesday Vignette, hosted by Anna of Flutter and Hum.

Today I am featuring the survivors from my Goldenrod purchases of a couple of years ago.  The ones that didn't survive were the dwarf varieties Laurin and Little Lemon, and the herbal scented variety, Solidago odora.  They grew their first season, but didn't return the next year.  But the survivors are doing well, sending out rhizomes and blooming happily again.

Solidago sphacelata 'Golden Fleece', which has a basal clump of larger leaves-


Solidago shortii 'Solar Cascade', which is taller with a long cascading stems, which means they flop a lot, the internet photos showed wonderful clumps with flower sprays shooting off, maybe that will take a few years.  I also read that it is on the endangered species list, so you might consider growing it, nexyt year I will have to try cutting it back early in the season to see if it will do some branching and be shorter-


Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks', named for flowers which seem to shoot off in many directions, it might also benefit from cutting it back early in the season-


I'm enjoying watching them increase by rhizomes but it seems like it will take a few more years to have a big clump.  I would like to think the pollinators would like them but don't see many in action.  The Solidago odora would have been good for making tea, I think the others could be used but might not be as tasty.  My Native American Medicinal Plants book by Daniel E. Moerman tells of uses for various goldenrods by Native American tribes, for complaints such as diarrhea, colds, liver problems, as a sedative, and so forth.  These varieties are not native in my area but the few natives are not available commercially as far as I know, they are short rhizomatous plants with small inflorescences.  They look charming, perhaps someday I can find some.

What native plants are blooming now for you?    Hannah

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13 comments:

  1. Nice goldenrod. That is really the iconic autumn plant, isn't it? How glad I am to welcome this first day of the new season.

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  2. Beautiful Goldenrods!
    Hope you are having a great week!
    Happy Wildflower Wednesday!
    Lea

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  3. Replies
    1. There are a number of growers that sell them. I was sad that all that I bought didn't grow, but it is great to have some. It would be really cool to actually have some of the ones that are native to my state, they don't look much like these.

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  4. I'm happy to have goldenrods now, they should eventually spread into impressive clumps, judging from photos I've seen on the internet. After our hot dry summer I have to admit I'm looking forward to autumn this year. I'm also making plans for adding more drought and heat tolerant plants next year.

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    1. This comment was to Dorothy Borders.

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  5. Hello Hannah, the Goldenrods are so pretty. I have been noticing them growing wild in several places. Have a happy day and weekend ahead!

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    1. I like them, I would get more but never see them in nurseries. I enjoy wild flowers that need no care.

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  6. I have 'Fireworks' in the garden. The only time it needed staking was after a particularly heavy downpour. I've divided it many times to share and to introduce into various areas. It seems to do well under any conditions as long as it gets at least a half-day of sun. Nstive goldenrods pop up around the woodland's edge. I didn't know about its uses by native peoples, so thanks for that.

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    1. Solar Cascade and Golden Fleece probably get more sun, but at least they are all growing and eventually will hopefully look like the photos. It's fun to have them bloom at this time of year.

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  7. This particular solidago as well as other varieties seem to peter out in my garden, but the more aggressive natives certainly make a nice clump that keeps going. Enjoy!

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  8. The three I showed are 2 years old and doing well. I should have tried one of the invasive ones too, perhaps, but I would really love to have some of the short ones that are native here, they are not in stores, I'm afraid.

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  9. Now I know the names of all those pretty and colorful flowers..thanks to you :)..

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